North devon dating online


The Tame now runs under the town in culverts and is only visible higher up the town as Brimley Brook, joined by smaller streams such as the Winterbourne (an intermittent stream, which flows only in winter or after heavy rain).Documents indicate that Teignmouth was a significant port by the early 14th century, second in Devon only to Dartmouth.on the 26th day of this instant July 1690 by Foure of the clocke in the morning, your poor petitioners were invaded (by the French) to the number of 1,000 or thereabouts, who in the space of three hours tyme, burnt down to the ground the dwelling houses of 240 persons of our parish and upwards, plundered and carried away all our goods, defaced our churches, burnt ten of our ships in the harbour, besides fishing boats, netts and other fishing craft ...by the late horrid invasion there were within the space of 12 houres burnt downe and consumed 116 dwelling houses ...During the 17th century, in common with other Channel ports, Teignmouth ships suffered from raids from Dunkirkers, who were privateers from Flemish ports.It is possible that smuggling was the town's most significant trade at this time, though cod fishing in Newfoundland was also of great importance.



-məth) is a large seaside town, fishing port and civil parish in the English county of Devon, situated on the north bank of the estuary mouth of the River Teign about 14 miles south of Exeter. In 1690, it was the last place in England to be invaded by a foreign power.Nonetheless settlements very close by are attested earlier, with the banks of the Teign estuary having been in Saxon hands since at least 682, a battle between the Ancient Britons and Saxons being recorded on Haldon in 927, and Danish raids having occurred on the Teign estuary in 1001.There were originally two villages, East and West Teignmouth, separated by a stream called the Tame, which emptied into the Teign through marshland by the current fish quay.The Newfoundland fisheries continued to provide the main employment into the early 19th century (e.g.

Job Brothers & Co., Limited) and, fortuitously for the town, as the fisheries declined the prospect of tourism arose.

The railway arrived in 1846 and the pier was built 1865–7.